Symposium

Artificial Intelligence in 21st Century Education

OCTOBER 21, 2018: RECEPTION AT SHOPIFY, OTTAWA, ONTARIO 18:00 – 20:00

OCTOBER 22, 2018: SYMPOSIUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA 8:00 – 16:45

Join us for a day of disruptive dialogue about Artificial Intelligence and 21st Century Education in Ottawa, an annual international symposium hosted by the University of Ottawa in collaboration with Carleton University, St. Paul University, Algonquin College, La Cité, and the Centre franco-ontarien de ressources pedagogique (CFORP).

Join international experts, academics and professionals, government and industry leaders as we discuss the following themes:

INVITED PANELISTS

Rediet Abebe

Rediet Abebe

PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Science at Cornell University

BIO

Dr. Sofian Audry

Dr. Sofian Audry

University of Maine

BIO

James Barrat

James Barrat

Documentary Filmmaker

BIO

Dr. Chris Dede

Dr. Chris Dede

Harvard University

BIO

Stephen Downes

Stephen Downes

Specialist in online learning technology and new media

BIO

Nevena Francetic

Nevena Francetic

Senior Data Scientist at Shopify

BIO

Dr. Timnit Gebru

Dr. Timnit Gebru

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

BIO

Abhishek Gupta

Abhishek Gupta

Founder of the Montreal AI Ethics Institute

BIO

Dr. Ian Kerr

Dr. Ian Kerr

Canada Research Chair in Ethics, Law and Technology, University of Ottawa

BIO

Dr. Matthew McKean

Dr. Matthew McKean

Associate Director of Education at the Conference Board of Canada

BIO

Alastair Summerlee

Alastair Summerlee

Former President of Carleton University and Guelph University

BIO

Education in the 21st Century: A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence

Here is a sampling of some of the questions we will explore:

What configurations of power, economics and industry drive the design, development and deployment of AI?  To what extent can institutions of higher education play a role in the harnessing of AI?

To what extent do the dictates and demands of the push towards ever-increasing development of AI – as played out in research and private sector interests – displace the traditional skills, knowledge and expertise that our institutions of higher learning continue to train and educate its students for? What societal safeguards might we need to create and implement in light of such a potential radical disruption?

What are some of the current benefits AI has provided to institutions of higher education in administrative and disciplinary applications?

How might we conceive of a more equitably-designed, developed and deployed AI in light of the rate and range of disruption some have forecast as inevitable?
Technology is giving life the potential to flourish like never before – or to self-destruct.

Future of Life Institute

Molecule in form of hand, Abstract background of atom or molecule structure, Medical background, 3d illustration.

The quote above perhaps best illustrates the two broad positions weighing-in on the overall impact Artificial Intelligence will have on our world.

On the one hand, there are those who believe that civilization faces profound and eminent dangers with the unfettered development of AI, leading to a situation in which its power will ultimately exceed our capacity to manage it, rendering humans incapable of directing and controlling it, thus leading to our ultimate downfall.

On the other – there are those who believe that AI will ultimately be driven by the needs of its designers and radically transform our world for the better. They believe that AI’s immense power will be contained and managed, unfolding within the parameters in which they were envisioned and programmed.

Obviously these two views characterize the polar extremes of the AI debate. While the E21 Symposium on Artificial Intelligence will sometimes refer to them as touchstones possibilities – the purpose of the Symposium is to critically explore the range of political, economic, legal, social, global and ethical implications – particularly as such technological developments will significantly impact on the educational arena writ large:

  • The use of AI in the administrative and academic operations, raising questions about: individual privacy issues, consent of use of individual data, veracity of data and reliability of algorithms
  • The education/training of AI professionals
  • The preparation of the student body in general in adjusting to rapid changes in the workforce do to the exponential expansion of Artificial Intelligence.

Our goal then, is to encourage disruptive dialogue – to break conventional thinking and explore alternative ways of imagining, conceptualizing and conveying a wide-range of emerging and evolving questions pertaining to the broad cultural impact of artificial intelligence.

Please note that photographs and/or video will be taken at this event. By taking part in this event you grant the event organisers full rights to use the images resulting from the photography/video filming for publicity or other purposes. This might include (but is not limited to) the right to use them in printed and online publicity, social media and press releases. If you do not wish to be photographed, please inform an event organiser.

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