AI and Diversity - Artificial Intelligence in 21st Century Education

AI and Diversity

AI and Diversity

An interview with 2 experts: Rediet Abebe and Timnit Gebru.

Rediet AbebeRediet Abebe is a PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Science at Cornell University, where she is advised by Professor Jon Kleinberg. Her research focuses on algorithms, AI, and applications to social good. She is a co-founder and co-organizer of Black in AI, a group for sharing ideas, fostering collaborations and discussing initiatives to increase the presence of Black people in the field of artificial intelligence. She is also a co-founder and co-organizer of Mechanism Design for Social Good, an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional research group working on applications of algorithms and AI to social good. Her work has been supported by fellowships and scholarships through Facebook and Google. She is also a 2013-2014 Harvard-Cambridge Fellow. Prior to Cornell, she completed an M.S. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University, an M.A. in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge, and a B.A. in Mathematics from Harvard University. She was born and raised in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Timnit GebruTimnit Gebru just finished her postdoc at Microsoft Research, New York City in the FATE (Fairness Transparency Accountability and Ethics in AI) group, where she studied algorithmic bias and the ethical implications underlying any data mining project.

She received her PhD from the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, studying computer vision under Fei-Fei Li. Her thesis pertains to data mining large scale publicly available images to gain sociological insight, and working on computer vision problems that arise as a result. The Economist and others have recently covered part of this work. Some of the computer vision areas she is interested in include fine-grained image recognition, scalable annotation of images, and domain adaptation. Prior to joining Fei-Fei’s lab she worked at Apple designing circuits and signal processing algorithms for various Apple products including the first iPad. She also spent an obligatory year as an entrepreneur (as all Stanford undergrads seem to do). Her research was supported by the NSF foundation GRFP fellowship and the Stanford DARE fellowship.

Tell us about the work you are doing in AI.

What was it that compelled you to work in the area of AI and inclusion?

What are some of challenges facing education (formal and informal) and students in the rapid development and deployment of AI?

Do you think it possible to build ethical safeguards within AI? Is there evidence in the development of other technologies where this has been demonstrated?

How might we conceive of a more equitably-designed, developed and deployed AI in light of the rate and range of disruption some have forecast as inevitable?

Tell us about the work you are doing in AI.

What was it that compelled you to work in the area of AI and inclusion?

You are the co-founder of Black in AI. Can you talk about why you co-founded this group and talk a little bit about what the group does?

What are some of challenges facing education (formal and informal) and students in the rapid development and deployment of AI?

What configurations of power, economics and industry drive the design, development, and deployment of AI? To what extent can institutions of higher education play a role in the harnessing of AI?